In an act of public humiliation, the Germans force Rabbi Chaim Sussman to remove his clothing outside on the street in Kolbuszowa. 

1941, Kolbuszowa, Poland. United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington, DC.

In an act of public humiliation, the Germans force Rabbi Chaim Sussman to remove his clothing outside on the street in Kolbuszowa.

1941, Kolbuszowa, Poland. United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington, DC.

Mikrus MR-300, Polish Microcar, produced in 1957-1960. 
Only 1728 units built.

Mikrus MR-300, Polish Microcar, produced in 1957-1960.
Only 1728 units built.

People’s home in what was formerly known as QwaQwa Buntestan, South Africa, 2005.
Photo by Greg

People’s home in what was formerly known as QwaQwa Buntestan, South Africa, 2005.
Photo by Greg

The Godsfield Pyx, Britain, ca. 1350-1400, Victoria & Albert Museum, London

The Godsfield Pyx, Britain, ca. 1350-1400, Victoria & Albert Museum, London

"Even though the ozone layer is about 40 km (25 miles) thick, the total amount of ozone, compared with more abundant atmospheric gases, is quite small. If all of the ozone in a vertical column reaching up through the atmosphere were compressed to sea-level pressure, it would form a layer only a few millimetres thick."

"ozonosphere" in Encyclopædia Britannica, 2011.

We’re all gonna die :(

Onuora Nzekwu, Nigerian author and journalist:
"The truth is that a lot of people’s reassessment of life and living has changed very much from what it used to be and because of this their approach to bringing up their children has shifted from the approach that was used in our younger days. When we were young if we are walking along the street and we do something funny, the elder by way side will either hit your head or cane you.
“Go and call your father, or go and call your mother,” you will cry and go and tell them, they will first rush out, “who is the man, where is the man” or before they ask you where is the man or before they confirm the man, they will ask why did he hit you, what did you do “I didn’t do anything.” “And he hit you” and then they will see the man who beat you, see the cane in his hand “Why did you beat him” they will ask “Didn’t your son tell you what he did, did you teach him to urinate on the street, to walk along the street?” “Was that what you did?”  Your father will take the cane and hit you some more, your mother will beat and lock you inside, next day, you will know that you did something wrong.
Then, neighbour and friends and even strangers take delight in helping you develop manners so, but today it is different, you put a boy in school, a teacher beats the boy in school, the boy runs home to tell his father or mother, they both get themselves sticks because they are going to the school, go and show us the teacher and in the presence of all the school children they start beating the teacher without asking what the problem was. So, we need to re-orientate ourselves, maybe we look back at how our elders brought us up and see what we can transfer from their method or their approach and develop ourselves well because until we do, we will keep sinking and sinking.”
Interview with Victor Nze, 2012

His description of how it used to be is remarkably alike the experience of growing up in the USSR, where children were considered public property. I’m not going into detail about how wrong it is to cane children — even though you’d die trying to explain that to someone as rooted in the patriarchal structure of the country as Nzekwu. But the reality is both in Russia and Nigeria, and many of the other Third World Countries, the outlook on corporal punishment remains the same today.
But then Nzekwu describes how today kids tell their parents about being beaten at school, and parents go to school to beat the teachers in return. It’s vague, and I really want to understand, what’s happening there: do parents now trust their children more than they trust the public opinion and are against corporal punishment, and Nzekwu is just an old unenlightened guy unhappy with the modern times, or is it the way of Nigerian parents telling the teachers that they’ll fight their own battles with their children? I’d strongly prefer the former, even though it’s still pretty messed up, parents trusting their children at least a small bit should be an improvement. 
The issue of trust between children and parents in Russia is something I’d really like to research, from the news articles on connected cases, it seems that the situation is different from before but still drastic.

Onuora Nzekwu, Nigerian author and journalist:

"The truth is that a lot of people’s reassessment of life and living has changed very much from what it used to be and because of this their approach to bringing up their children has shifted from the approach that was used in our younger days. When we were young if we are walking along the street and we do something funny, the elder by way side will either hit your head or cane you.

“Go and call your father, or go and call your mother,” you will cry and go and tell them, they will first rush out, “who is the man, where is the man” or before they ask you where is the man or before they confirm the man, they will ask why did he hit you, what did you do “I didn’t do anything.” “And he hit you” and then they will see the man who beat you, see the cane in his hand “Why did you beat him” they will ask “Didn’t your son tell you what he did, did you teach him to urinate on the street, to walk along the street?” “Was that what you did?”  Your father will take the cane and hit you some more, your mother will beat and lock you inside, next day, you will know that you did something wrong.

Then, neighbour and friends and even strangers take delight in helping you develop manners so, but today it is different, you put a boy in school, a teacher beats the boy in school, the boy runs home to tell his father or mother, they both get themselves sticks because they are going to the school, go and show us the teacher and in the presence of all the school children they start beating the teacher without asking what the problem was. So, we need to re-orientate ourselves, maybe we look back at how our elders brought us up and see what we can transfer from their method or their approach and develop ourselves well because until we do, we will keep sinking and sinking.”

Interview with Victor Nze, 2012

His description of how it used to be is remarkably alike the experience of growing up in the USSR, where children were considered public property. I’m not going into detail about how wrong it is to cane children — even though you’d die trying to explain that to someone as rooted in the patriarchal structure of the country as Nzekwu. But the reality is both in Russia and Nigeria, and many of the other Third World Countries, the outlook on corporal punishment remains the same today.

But then Nzekwu describes how today kids tell their parents about being beaten at school, and parents go to school to beat the teachers in return. It’s vague, and I really want to understand, what’s happening there: do parents now trust their children more than they trust the public opinion and are against corporal punishment, and Nzekwu is just an old unenlightened guy unhappy with the modern times, or is it the way of Nigerian parents telling the teachers that they’ll fight their own battles with their children? I’d strongly prefer the former, even though it’s still pretty messed up, parents trusting their children at least a small bit should be an improvement.

The issue of trust between children and parents in Russia is something I’d really like to research, from the news articles on connected cases, it seems that the situation is different from before but still drastic.

William Cornwallis Harris — A picture of King Mzilikazi, ca 1836.

Considered to be the second greatest African military leader, King Mzilikazi was kind of an asshole: knocking himself out with bloody murder, scorching earth and throwing opposition off cliffs. But he did stick it up to the Boers and organized his own, ethnically diverse kingdom Matabele, in what is now Rhodesia and Zimbabwe, and that’s all kinds of awesome. 

Well, the usual political pick’n’mix.

William Cornwallis Harris — A picture of King Mzilikazi, ca 1836.

Considered to be the second greatest African military leader, King Mzilikazi was kind of an asshole: knocking himself out with bloody murder, scorching earth and throwing opposition off cliffs. But he did stick it up to the Boers and organized his own, ethnically diverse kingdom Matabele, in what is now Rhodesia and Zimbabwe, and that’s all kinds of awesome.

Well, the usual political pick’n’mix.

Little Cossack in Lyubertsy by Olga Tikhonova, 2010

Cossacks are ridiculous and pretty much evil but their kids and their paraphernalia are really, really cute.

Little Cossack in Lyubertsy by Olga Tikhonova, 2010

Cossacks are ridiculous and pretty much evil but their kids and their paraphernalia are really, really cute.

Clay oven Kyrgyz bread by Augustflower, 2007

Clay oven Kyrgyz bread by Augustflower, 2007

Takada (Jōetsu), Niigata, Japan, 2009, by Twiga_Swala. The colors in the photographs had not been tweaked.